Wells Street Bridge

Crowded river scene

Crowded river scene

The Brown Line trains are running again now that repairs to the Wells Street Bridge have been completed.  It was quite a project!  When I took the train north across the bridge yesterday evening, the river was still crowded with repair barges and equipment.  A tour boat plied the waters, carrying its passengers toward an up-close view of the site.

Busy river (poster), © 2013 Celia Her City

View east of the Chicago River from the upper deck of the Wells Street Bridge.


Images have been ‘posterized.’
Click to enlarge.

One moment in Chicago’s long life

Repair barge in the Chicago River at Wells Street, © 2013 Celia Her City

The city is always building, leading to the complex vista that Celia, commuting, sees daily: the buildings, bridges, and balustrades rimming the River, offering a pleasing spectacle to the passing trains.  Cars, trains, boats, and pedestrians pass distractedly through a landscape that’s the work of many decades and thousands upon thousands of laborers’ hands.

The repair barge in the river, for fixing the bridge, is fleeting evidence of all that goes in to making this the home that we know.

A moment by the Mart

A moment by the Mart

I happened to be driving along Wacker Drive this evening, and, for once, was truly happy to have to stop for a red light.

I seldom come this way in a car, and this was my one chance to take a picture of the repairs underway on the historic Wells Street Bridge.  Not only did the Merchandise Mart look terrific, as always, but I managed to take a picture of the huge crane that has been used to hoist the massive prefabricated sections of the bridge in place.

The Wells Street Bridge was an engineering marvel when first built in the 1920s.  It is a double-decker draw bridge that carries both car traffic and, on its upper level, the elevated train.  Now most of the bridge is in need of repairs, so traffic has been cut off for a number of days, while old components are removed and the new ones put in place.

People grumble about the inconvenience.

The first phase of the work was completed Monday, as you can see from the el train that is crossing.  The second phase, which will be to replace the south section of the bridge, will require another closing and is scheduled to take place some time next month.

That’s the latest,
Celia

The bridges we don’t see

crossingover

The beautiful old bridges spanning the River: Celia doesn’t notice them much, and neither does he.  They are just the things we cross over, abstractedly.  Yet without them we would be divorced from ourselves, stuck with just a part of all that we are.

The Chicago River skyline and its bridges, © 2013 Celia Her City

The Chicago River skyline seen from atop the Wells Street Bridge.